Category Archives: Tips & Tricks


Back up your Facebook – or risk losing everything

Imagine you go to log into Facebook one day and your account, well, just isn’t there anymore. Scary, right?

Well that was the reality for US journalist Jeff Bercovici when a hacker took over an old email address of his that was associated with the account, and proceeded to change every single thing about it, including deleting nine years’ worth of his Facebook activity.

No red flags, no second chances, everything gone. Not worth thinking about, is it?

You can read the full story here – he is clear that a lot of the blame lies with him, in not having two-factor authentification enabled for his account, and for using an old email address that was in fact so ancient, and so unused, that it had been released back into circulation.

But, those key facts aside, just how easily the hacker was able to change everything about Jeff’s account once he was inside makes for chilling reading. Everything that made the account personal – its name, the profile picture, other pictures, posts and comments – were all either changed or deleted.

Seemingly with no comeback, without raising any security flags for unusual behaviour and with no chance to undo and get them back.

Now, because Jeff is an influential tech journalist based in San Francisco with over 7,000 Twitter followers, this is where his story starts to diverge from the usual user experience, something he acknowledges in his article.

A few phone calls and some insider assistance later, and his account has been fully restored. But, as was clear from the initial customer service response above, Facebook considers that once data has been deleted for any reason, as far as they are concerned it is gone for good.

So, how can you stop this happening to you? While this hacker wanted Jeff’s verified user status for himself, there’s nothing to stop people breaking into any account and taking it over, so what can you do to protect yourself?

Of course, taking all available security measures is a key one, so make sure you have enabled Facebook’s Login Approvals, which texts you a code if you access Facebook from an unrecognised device – ie one that hasn’t been used to log into your account before – and needs that code imputed before you can continue.

But the single most important thing you can do is back up your account. If the key details, such as your contacts, posts and pictures are saved, then anything happening to your account will not be such a disaster, right?

And how can you do that? With of course  – you can connect your personal accounts, as well as pages, to our app and run regular syncs so that the most important information you are sharing with your Facebook friends is backed up and so can’t be lost.

Check it out here – it’s free to download and use, and you get premium features including universal search, flashback and export ability free for a month as well!

Having your data – or at least a copy of the most important parts – in a place that you own and control (in this case the library on your computer) is the single most effective thing you can do to make sure that your data stays where it belongs- with you.

And why wouldn’t you want to do that?

Data privacy is entering a new age

Ten ways to keep your personal data safe online

The price of using websites and other online services is often giving away personal information about ourselves, but there are some quick and easy steps that we can all take to make that data as safe as possible.

The online world is often a strange one – we quite happily give information away to strangers that we would never dream of doing face to face, in the false belief it is what everyone is doing so must be safe.

And, while to a large degree it is, we do still need to take care, particularly not to give away unnecessary information that could be used for identify theft or just plain fraud.

So what should we be doing – and what must be avoided?

  1. Be clear who can see what – that means enabling, and checking, privacy settings for every social media site you use, and ensuring you only make payments through secured web pages when shopping or banking online.
  2. Have strong passwords – and don’t reuse them or write them down. We know this one is tricky. Great passwords, in terms of strength, are by their nature hard to recall, while easy-to-remember ones are not. But be savvy, because account security is everything – and enable two-stage authentication where you can, so you can get back into your account with minimal effort and fuss if you are hacked.
  3. Take care not to post information that is often used as security questions for internet banking services, such as your data of birth, mother’s maiden name or first pet. The more would-be fraudsters know about you, the easier it is to find, or convince someone to give them, the rest.
  4. Don’t fall for dodgy or so-called phishing emails – your bank, or other outlets that have card details, won’t ask for sensitive details over email, so beware any emails that do, no matter how official looking. If in doubt, call the institution on a number that you know is real.
  5. Be careful where you log-on – take care to disconnect from a session if using public computers in libraries, for example, and beware public wifi as its often not as secure as a home connection.
  6. On which note – make sure your home wifi is password-protected, so others can’t access it – both to try and get your details or piggyback on your data allowance.
  7. Keep spyware and virus scanners up to date on any device that you use to access the internet – viruses and keystroke loggers are both a big risk to your data
  8. Be wary about who you befriend online, and who you give personal information such as your address out to
  9. Beware what pictures and status updates tell a potential criminal about you – holiday pictures show you’re away from home, for example.
  10. Be sensible and always have your wits about you – only give out the information that is needed by any one site, don’t take risks with your personal information, or your safety, and if something feels wrong take heed and get yourself out of the situation.

The internet is a wonderful thing for so many reasons, but treat it with the respect it deserves and you’ll be able to just enjoy it and not fear it.


Welcome, Sophie, to a world of happy memories you can enjoy forever

We’ve welcomed a new addition to the family recently, and it’s given us a reminder of the pleasure of making memories.

Little Sophie was born weighing 8lbs 8oz and, along with her mum, is doing well. Her proud parents have, of course, been taking lots of pictures of her, and as a family they are already making happy memories that they will want to keep and treasure forever.

That’s not been the only new arrival for us recently, as another of our staff had a baby boy, Edison, at the end of August and we released the latest version of our app (our biggest and ongoing baby!) earlier this month.

Making and sharing happy memories on our social media accounts is something most of us take for granted these days, but increasingly there is demand to keep our own physical back-ups of our happiest times as well, so we have somewhere to access them if a network crashes, a camera containing precious photos gives up the ghost, or the platform where we have posted them to share proudly with the world loses them or ceases to function.

It is when we are having our best times that the issue of keeping those memories safe forever should be at the forefront of our minds. Nothing lasts indefinitely, so having a copy of all our precious memories so that they are able to just makes sense.

With, you are now able to add your own memories and pictures manually, as well as back up pictures and statuses you have posted to a wide variety of social media accounts, so it really can be a full and true picture of who you are and what is important to you.

Don’t leave the continued presence of your most precious memories and pictures to chance, ensure their ongoing survival – and your ongoing ability to reminisce and remind yourself of favourite times now and in the future – by downloading our app and adding your life to it.

And to Sophie,’s youngest memory maker, we wish years of happy and memorable experiences, that she too in time will be able to look back on with our app and enjoy all over again.

Digi Me Instagram Filters Filter Usage

Back up your Instagram – or risk losing everything

Instagram users have reported having their entire accounts suspended or deleted without warning, with no chance to save or back up their content first.

The issue was first highlighted by Hugo Baeta, a Portugese web designer living in San Francisco, who wrote a blog on his shock of having his account with over 900 photos in it deleted hours after posting five videos from a Janet Jackson concert.

What concerned him most was the speed of the action taken, with his account being completely deleted without a chance of defending himself or being  given the opportunity to remove them.

When he tried to respond to links in the emails sent about the videos, which had been the subject of copyright claims, presumably from Jackson’s legal team, he was unable to login and then directed to a help article that told him: “Your account has been deleted for not following our terms. You won’t be able to log into this account and no one else will be able to see it. We’re unable to restore accounts that are deleted for these types of violations.”

As he explained in his blog: “So, my Instagram account got deleted without them giving me any kind of actionable options to follow up. I can’t contest the take-down notice (which would be my legal right), because I can no longer log into my account. My account got deleted for posting 5 videos from a concert that I really loved – something I’ve done countless times with other artists I saw perform live.”

Getting to the crux of the matter, he added: “All of this made me quite introspective today. Something so tiny, in the grand scheme of things, actually has shaken me. I was looking back at all the photos I posted on Instagram over these 3 years (over 900 photos) and all the memories they are associated with. It’s a shame all the comments and reactions to them are lost now. But none of it was ever “mine” to begin with, right?  It’s a fine line for these social network companies… they need users to exist, yet users aren’t the client, we are the product they sell to advertisers.”

Of course, he’s wrong in one way – whatever the T&Cs of the various networks, content and information created by us or about us does fundamentally belong to us – but that’s of very little help in a situation like this where the platform holds all the power.

Occurrences like this show why it is critical that each and every one of us has all of our information, or at least a copy of it, in a place that we own and control – and it is this vital work which is a big driver in the continuing growth and development of our free app, which does just that.

Luckily for Hugo, he has a friend at Facebook (which owns Instagram), who helped him get his account reinstated. But it is clear from the blog comments that others in the same position were not so fortunate. And even Hugo himself is clear he will transition away from Instagram, his faith in it tarnished by this unpleasant experience.

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Goodbye SocialSafe! Hello latest version of!

So that’s it then – the end of an era. SocialSafe is no more as the new version of our app, released this week, completes the name change to

So what will this mean for you? Well, only good things. The app that you know and love is now fully and 100 per cent, while keeping all the best bits of the SocialSafe days onwards.

As ever, a new version brings even more improvements and v7.0.9, for those of you keeping track, is no different.

With a new tiled Home screen containing little snapshots of your life, there’s a fresher look and feel when you open up the app.

You can add a variety of widgets to your Home to make it truly personal – and we’ve created a bunch for you to get started, so have some fun with them.

There are also some further performance improvements, minor bug fixes and user interface changes, but the key things you know and love are still there waiting for you.

So supports the same networks, offers you the same opportunities to search your content and make collections or PDFs if you have a premium account. We’ve just improved your ability to keep your digital life in better order!

So what are you waiting for? Download the latest version now!


10 top tips for social media confidence

Want to do more on social media but unsure where to start? Fear not – you’re not alone and we can help.

The sheer volume of information flowing past your eyes when you look at any platform can be intimidating, but start small and know what you want to achieve, and there is very little you can do wrong.

So, without further ado, here are our top tips for getting on top of social media quickly. They’re only guidelines, so feel free to adapt them – but the most important thing is just to get posting!

1) Don’t overcommit. This shouldn’t be a stress, so don’t go crazy and vow to update everything every 20 minutes of every working day. Rather, aim for at least three times a week on each platform you use.

2) Quality beats quantity. Better to share less and it be interesting, than put up things you haven’t read properly or that don’t fully reflect your/the product values in the rush to update your status with something (this goes back to no 1). As part of this, know overall (and ideally with each post) who your audience is and what you want them to do (be more aware of you, buy something etc)

3) Make it personal. While you may well be operating a business account, people like to do business with people, and so personalising what you say, and adding in bits of your life where you’re happy and it’s relevant, is often a very good way of making your followers know and trust you.

4) Analyse post engagements to see if you can see any kind of pattern – do you get most interactions in the morning, evening, or is there quite a uniform spread? Target it if so, aim for a spread of times if not. You can pre-schedule both tweets and FB posts using either Buffer or Hootsuite.

5) Aim for a spread of news/informative posts and pure sales pitches – I’ve seen 70/30 per cent seen as a good balance.

6) Find a quick and easy way to aggregate the types of articles you might want to look for, so that you can always find source material with ease. I recommend Feedly, which allows you to search and group articles by area type.

7) Follow other industry figures and look at what they do, how they do it and what they link to. Not to copy, exactly, but to get inspiration for what you want on your own feed.

8) Follow people in the same/related fields as you, so you can get an increased following of relevant users, get involved in industry conversations, be aware of news, and get inspiration for other posts.

9) Consider doing something like product of the week, where you look at a particular product in detail in a review style and/or competitions to win products or services.

10) Add value to everything you post and give people a reason to follow you and buy from you!

Of course, once you’ve started posting and interacting on your social media accounts, you’re going to want to download so that you can retain everything and reuse it as needed!


British spies want shorter and less secure passwords

If you thought the purpose of passwords was to be as strong as possible to give your information and accounts the best chance of being secure, Britain’s spies at GCHQ have news for you.

In a new document, Password Guidance – simplifying your approach (PDF), the organisation’s cyber director said that advice has moved on from previous guidance to make passwords stronger as a greater deterrant to hacking.

Now, the spy agency is suggesting IT managers help install systems that make passwords easier to remember. Yes, you did read that right.

The report claims that the average UK user has 22 different online systems that are password protected – clearly more than most people can remember – with the same supposedly safe password used to access around four of these.

It says the need to remember multiple passwords for different sites leads to unsafe behaviour, such as writing them down, duplication, or using simple or predictable passwords creation strategies.

But it also stresses that, crucially, the bottom line is that even following best practice guidelines (ie not doing any of the above) cannot guarantee keeping online services secure. Key loggers, phishing and interception are all cited as credible risks, with information about how to carry them out and the tools to do so easily discoverable on the internet.

In a foreword to the report, Ciaran Martin, Director General for Cyber Security at GCHQ (cool job title!) said: “Complex passwords do not usually frustrate attackers, yet they make daily life much harder for users. They create cost, cause delays, and may force users to adopt workarounds or non-secure alternatives that increase risk.”

It suggests that simplifying an organisation’s approach to passwords can reduce the workload on users, lessen the IT burden, and – crucially – “combat the false sense of security that unnecessarily complex passwords can encourage.”

It lists seven key steps that organisations (and individuals) can take to optimise system security, which are:

  1. Change all default passwords (well, durr)
  2. Only implement passwords when needed to minimise user overload
  3. Understand the limitations of user-generated passwords (tl:dr they encourage insecure behaviour)
  4. Except machine-generated ones have their own problems (tl:dr they’re difficult to remember)
  5. Prioritise admin, mobile and remote user accounts as these are more important/vulnerable
  6. Use account lockout and protective monitoring
  7. And, of course, don’t store passwords as plain text

Will seeming to be good, impartial advice, it’s worth remembering that this does come from the people who broke antivirus software so they could spy on people, so feel free to take it with a piece of salt if you are of a cynical disposition.

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How to check your Facebook privacy settings

Facebook is a social giant that holds huge amounts of personal information about each of us.

Facebook is also renowned for changing its privacy policies frequently and not necessarily advertising this fact, so it pays to check at regular intervals that you’re only sharing what you post (as well as what you have posted and will post in the future) with the audience you expect.

So, how can you check what your current settings are? Partly in response to criticisms that it wasn’t open enough about what info was being shared, Facebook has a new tool called Privacy Check-up.

Accessed from the padlock dropdown at the top right of the page, the privacy shortcuts panel that opens up gives you options for a quick check of who can see your stuff, who can contact you and what you can do is someone is bothering you.

While these options are helpful, the top option is to open the Privacy Check-up, which then takes you through your privacy basics in three quick and easy sections.

The first looks at your Posts,  explaining that this setting controls who can see what you post from the top of your news feed or profile, as well as showing what your current setting is, and giving an obvious drop-down if you want to make changes for future posts.

The next step is Apps, with a list of what you’ve logged in to with Facebook. It explains that you can edit who sees each app you use and any future posts the app creates for you, or delete the apps you no longer use. It also gives you a link to the App Settings with a reminder that you can edit them at any time.

The third page covers your profile and personal information – so who can see the likes of your mobile number, email and date of birth if you have shared them with Facebook. It also reminds you that you may have shared more information about yourself and recommends you check your About page to see that is up to date as well.

Then you’re finished, safe in the knowledge that you’re only sharing what you post on Facebook with the people that you want to see it.

And, of course, once you’re done, don’t forget to download for free to back-up your posts and pictures forever, giving you ongoing access to them even if you decide to delete your account in the future.


Flashback for Friday Fun!

Schools in the UK start back this week after the summer break, and my timeline on Facebook is awash with little faces wearing pristine uniform that is a touch too big for them as they head off into formal education for the first time.

A time to move forward to be sure, as I’m one of those mums who will have done just that by the time you read this. But my flashback feature is also active, showing me an adorable picture of my now toddler when he was very tiny two years ago.

Between them, these two features got me thinking a lot about the present and past, mainly along the lines of how quickly time is flying by, and how life moves on at such a pace these days it can be hard to hold on to all your memories, even the precious ones.

Thankfully, flashback in is a great feature for finding out what you were doing on this day one, two, five or even longer years ago and being reminded of things big and small, personal and professional that had slipped from your mind.

A premium account feature (you can try it without charge for 30 days when you download the normal version, which is free to all), simply click on the flashback icon on the menu bar to see what you did across all linked accounts on this day in years past. And if you want to check other days, either specifically or random ones, just click on the calendar icon in the top green bar and then zip around to your heart’s content.

Happy flashbacking! grey-text-inline

10 ways gives you back control of your data

News of data breaches and leaks has been everywhere recently, particularly in the wake of the Ashley Madison hack.

And yet, as our popular blog on the apps that are spying on your life proved, we are giving more and more about ourselves away without questioning it, often in the mistaken belief it is the only way we can access free services.

Two big (often unspoken) truths are that many apps ask for many more permissions than they need as a default, and also that free does not have to mean giving up the rights to the data that makes up you.

Here at, we like to think in terms of the internet of me – you, at the centre of your world, fully in control of what data about you is shared and with whom. Clearly, with so much about each of us already in the wild, that full dream remains a work in progress, but our app gives you back control of your data for you to choose and use as you wish. How? Well, here are just some of the ways:

  1. By backing-up your social network content. You can use to sync four accounts from the main social media platforms, meaning you can delete your accounts if you choose in future and still have whatever you posted there, complete with the original likes and comments.
  2. Having all the data YOU posted, at YOUR fingertips – you can jump around the journal view or search across all platforms to find something you need without being constrained by search or any post visibility activated by the channels themselves.
  3. By us NEVER seeing any of your data, yet bringing it to you in a format that you can easily search and use.
  4. Run a small business and want to analyse when your posts get most interaction? Use our insight tool to find out what and when you should be posting, or download your follower data in a spreadsheet to investigate how it has grown or who has stopped following you.
  5. Feeling overwhelmed by the size of your networks? See who you have most interactions with on Facebook, for example, if you’re minded to create lists. Or see who is no longer friends with or following you if you want to cull them back.
  6. Use our flashback feature to see what you were doing on this day last year, the year before or five years ago – remember things you wanted to do, or anniveraries of things you did do that might otherwise be forgotten.
  7. Make a collection – your favourite pictures or interactions, stored together, and able to be saved and downloaded as a PDF, complete with the original comments.
  8. Compliance requirements for your business? Find anything you’ve ever said and reuse or record as necessary in a matter of moments.
  9. Organise your content into collections, grouping similar content or separating public and personal. All, of course, easy to find when you need it again for any reason.
  10. By having, at your fingertips, the complete story of you. What you said, what you did and who you did it with, even the ability to add thoughts, moments and pictures that were not (gasp!) documented on social media.

Sharing everything for free use is not good data privacy, is not the future and should not be how the world works. Join the online revolution, start taking your data power back and download for free today!