Tag Archives: facebook

Facebook-people

Facebook celebrates our friendships on its 12th birthday

Facebook turns 12 today – which means for most of us there really was a life before it, however it feels sometimes – and it is celebrating users’ friendships to mark the event.

For what the site has dubbed Friends Day, each will see a custom video that celebrates their own lives and friendships popping up at the top of their News Feed, which only they can see unless they choose to share it on their timeline. You can also view your own by clicking ‘watch yours’ at the bottom of a friend’s video.

I’ve seen mine and it’s nicely done – good choice of friends (social interaction data) as well as some pictures that got a good number of likes and comments (most popular data), overlaid with comments from them and a scrolling screen of friends wishing me happy birthday and other nice things in the past.

So, it’s cute, and I don’t doubt that my timeline will be awash with them as more and more of my friends log on through the course of the day.

But what else is the video really telling us? How much time we spend on the network, for one – and just how many important and significant moments are posted or celebrated there.

It’s also a reminder of how pervasive it has become in just over a decade – I have only a handful of friends not on there, and for many, particularly those living abroad, it’s my sole point of contact with them, and how I keep up with their lives.

There are certainly people on there who I wouldn’t be in touch with at all if it weren’t for the ease of keeping up through FB – not because I don’t like them or they’re not important, but because Facebook just makes keeping in touch so effortless once you’re connected.

And that ease of connection and sharing is obviously a huge factor in the news, announced recently, that Facebook now has 1.1 billion users a day. That’s a huge, huge number – something like one in every 9 people on the planet.

Speaking about why it was celebrating users on Friends Day, Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg said: “That’s what the best movements do. You find ways to keep it focused on the needs of the community, and it’s not about you.

“And that’s the whole point of Friends Day. We felt like the world was making it too much about us and it’s not about us.”

In actual fact, Facebook couldn’t be more about you, or me, or all of our friends – because our data and our use makes it what it is, end of.

So if you like how Facebook has explored your data, or have suddenly realised just how much of your life is on there, then our digi.me app and its data backup powers combined with powerful insights about which of your posts or pictures are most liked, or who you most influential followers are, is something you’re going to love. Try a free download now!

 

 

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#7 (of 12) reasons to love digi.me – we help you know your friends better!

Coming to the end of the year, we all get very nostalgic looking back on the months gone -but as you use digi.me to flashback through your year, did you ever consider you can also use it to see how well you actually know your friends?

Once again, that’s something that digi.me is really good for – and so for the seventh day of Christmas, my true love gave to me – greater insight about my online community!

Yes, you might think you know your friends – particularly those who you are, perhaps, related to, or see often in real life – but onlife life can be a mysterious and weird thing, and the quiet ones IRL can be quite the opposite from the other side of a screen.

But how would you know this? Once again, our super widgets are the way. We have both a most active one and a most influential one – use across all your accounts or just one at a time to see who’s got the most followers or interacts with you most.

Both cycle through the top few results when they’re sitting prettily on your desktop. Clicking on the most influential opens up the bio information of, for eg, twitter top bods, giving you follower counts and any other information shared such as location.

With most active, which is more personal, clicking on the picture opens the most recent posts and pictures of yours that the pictured person has liked or commented on.

As with many of our coolest features, this is for premium users only – but this could quickly and easily be you, as digi.me is only a download away and half price for all of December – get it now!

 

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50% off digi.me: Collected photo fun is the #6 (of 12) reasons to love our app!

digi.me’s vision has always been that gathering all of your personal data in one place makes sense for so many reasons including privacy and control – but having all your pictures from across your social media together is a huge deal as well.

So, on the sixth day of Christmas, my true love brought to me – all my photos in one place!

Yes, as well as the many and varied benefits that having digi.me brings to your life (you have read all the blogs above, yes? Good, good!) – one that is sometimes overlooked because there are JUST SO MANY COOL THINGS TO TELL YOU ABOUT is the gift of having a complete gallery of your life that you can navigate and organise as you want.

If you’re anything like most people (and sadly, as individual as we all think we are, we do end up displaying herd qualities), then you use different networks for different reasons. Maybe the audience is niche, maybe you like to show off different sides of your personality, maybe you’re just trying to win at them all and adapting accordingly – who knows?

But we digress. So Facebook ends up being your cute and family pictures, for example, Twitter is for silly things you see, pictures of cats and random political opinions (pictures optional), while Instagram is for showing off those beautiful meals you cook once in a blue moon and those moody weather shots you took on a rain-soaked walk.

All of them are elements of you, but none are the whole – until you put them together. So now you can see all the shots you took on any given day – of anything, from anywhere – on your computer in your private digi.me library, together for the first time.

You can search by albums under the pictures tab, or by a single date or chosen date range – and you can do this all in one place.

Enjoy reliving special days, special people and moments in time you had forgotten – all with their original likes and comments to put them in context.

If you want to gather them all together for any reason, you can even export them together as a PDF or to Evernote – and they’ll still retain those all-important interactions.

Really, if you love your life enough to chronicle and share it, then you need to be backing up these pictures and giving them a new lease of life with digi.me.

With a host of cool features including flashback and Collections, we know you’ll love our app – and digi.me is 50% off for the whole of December, so what are you waiting for?

Go on, download now and see just what we mean.

 

 

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50% off digi.me: flashback is the #3 (of 12) reasons to love us!

Christmas is a common time to indulge in what has been as we prepare to turn the corner on a new year – but what if you could look into the fun of years past on any given day all year?

Well, guess what – with digi.me you can, and so on the third day of Christmas, my true love gave to me the gift of flashback!

Yes, our brilliant app with all its many other cool features (gathering all your social networks in one place, for a start, plus being able to search for anything across all platforms and create collections of related content as just two of many others) also allows you to zip back in time and see your activity on your linked networks on any given day. Cooler than  Christmas snow, yes?

Think of it as Facebook’s memory feature on steroids. Just one picture? Pah – we give you everything – a full look at what you posted, shared, liked and favourited – and best of all we retain links to the original posts as well as comments and likes on them – so you can go as deep down the historical wormhole as you fancy and come back across all sorts of things you’d forgotten.

Sound like fun? That’s because it is. The good (family gatherings, time with loved ones) the bad (possibly the same, almost certainly pictures someone has scanned from your pre-selfie teenage years) and the ugly (messy nights out, bad perms, bad glasses, bad, well, anything) – they’re all still there, frozen in time and waiting to be rediscovered. Hours of fun to be had.

The flashback feature on our front page will automatically show you years past on the date you visit, so you can either make a date to come back every day forever (potentially fun but time intensive), or just use the date function at the top right to zip around either at random or to dates like your birthday or key anniversaries.

And, of course, no post combining Christmas and flashbacks is complete without a joke referencing the ghosts of Christmas past (hoho), so a) here it is and b) feel free to go and check those out as well.

Are there other features we should tell you about? Of course there are, too many to go into detail about here, but they include being able to export to PDF and Evernote, and the ability to add up to 20 social media accounts and pages. And, of course, new features and capabilities are being added all the time – digi.me is only going to get better and better!

In a Christmas treat from us, digi.me premium is 50% off for the whole of December, so head over to our download page to bag your festive bargain now!

 

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50% off digi.me: #2 (of 12) reasons to love us – universal search!

Posting different parts of our lives to the different social networks and friends that cater for them can be lots of fun – but a huge pain when it comes to trying to find an elusive post or picture, right?

So, on the second day of Christmas my true love brought for me – universal search!

Yes, among the dozens of clever things you can do with digi.me, universal search is undoubtedly one of the cleverest.

So what do we mean by universal? Simply that you can search across all networks. Need to know if you wore your favourite Christmas dress to a party last year? What present you bought for your loved one (maybe even who your loved one was at that point?) digi.me can help. Simply fire up the app, hit the magnifying glass search icon in the top left and away you go.

You can narrow your search down if you’ve got a good idea about where what you are looking for might be found, or you can search everywhere if you don’t.

And not only will digi.me quickly and speedily find what you’re looking for from all your backed up accounts and the entire date range that your personal library spans, but we’ll then give you options of what you can do with that information.

Of course, you can just delight in the fact that you don’t need a new Christmas jumper as no pictures of last year’s exist (as if!), but you can also add your long-forgotten post to an existing collection of content, or create a new one (both exciting premium features). And you can even export it as a PDF or to Evernote – so many choices, so many options, it’s like Christmas has come early (hoho!).

And if that doesn’t sound tempting enough, digi.me premium also offers the chance to add up to 20 accounts.

Sound tantalisingly tempting? Then head over to our download page to bag your Christmas bargain now!

 

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50% off digi.me: #1 (of 12) reasons to love us – the gift of secure data!

On the first day of Christmas, my true love brought to me…all my social networks in one place for a fantastic limited-offer price! BUY DIGI.ME PREMIUM NOW!

Yes, no dodgy candle or bath products from the big man in red this year, the gift of digi.me is quite literally the gift that keeps on giving, combining posts from all your key social networks in one place to search, explore and enjoy for as long as you want!

Offering the option now to store all the important posts and pictures that make up the sum of the things you care about most, next year will see the change to add details such as finance, health and purchasing to your library which you can exchange with businesses of your choice for services, offers or rewards.

And the best bit? For this month we are offering our premium digi.me product – that’s the one with all the best bits we offer in – for 50pc off a year’s subscription, so $3.49 instead of $6.99. It was just what you asked for on your list, right? (We know you make a list, even if it’s just in your head)

So whether it’s Father Christmas’s present to you (which are always the best ones), or for someone who you love enough to give a gift that does something brilliant and doesn’t just sit on a shelf gathering dust, here’s the lowdown on why you should be jumping all over this offer.

Digi.me is completely private and all information is held on your computer. We never see it, it’s just for you to enjoy, use and share as you wish.

We support major networks including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn, with more coming all the time.

You can search across all platforms, gaining new insight into yourself and your life, create collections of favourite events or people (Christmases past, anyone?) and export them as PDFs to share or just to keep as hard copies.

More you say? Well, how about a widget-based front page, which offers you the chance to slice and dice your data how YOU want – such as most popular posts, most active friends and most influential followers. Even better – create your own, with our easy three-step guide.

We can’t guarantee the turkey will defrost in time, that your favourite Bond film will be on the telly or that you’ve been good enough for a visit from Santa – but we can guarantee that your data is held securely on your computer so you can do more with it.

Oh, and if you forget to get a present until Christmas Eve? It’s a download, with you in seconds. Really, if digi.me could cook it would have Christmas totally covered. Enjoy!

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Millions of Facebook users give up privacy to play words quiz

Over 17 million people have willingly (and in most cases unthinkingly) handed over huge amounts of their personal data to a company they know very little about in exchange for a graphic of their most-used words in status updates.

I know, right? It is, as Comparitech pointed out, essentially a privacy nightmare, but Facebook users can’t seem to get enough of it at the moment.

The quiz app, by Vonvon.me, works out what your most used words were in status updates this year, and presents them as a word cloud which you are then encouraged to share on your timeline. I’ve seen plenty on mine, and I bet you have too.

So far so straightforward – but how does the quiz app get that information? Yep, by mining the information you have posted/logged with the site.

According to Comparitech, that includes disclosing your:

  • Name, profile picture, age, sex, birthday, and other public info
  • Entire friend list
  • Everything you’ve ever posted on your timeline
  • All of your photos and photos you’re tagged in
  • Education history
  • Hometown and current city
  • Everything you’ve ever liked
  • IP address
  • Info about the device you’re using including browser and language

But it gets worse than that. The terms and conditions (that you have to sign up to when you authorise it to access your Facebook account, but which most people likely never read fully), allow Vonvon.me, among other things, to keep using non-identifying data for as long as they want, store it where they want, and sell it on to any third parties.

And all you got in return was a word cloud. Vonvon is not unusual in this, we’ve talked before about how most apps ask for far more permissions than they actually need to operate, and this is just one that’s gone viral.

But, as ever, it always pays to take care about what and who you hand your data over to. By all means take part in the Facebook quizzes and the like – but just take care about what they’re asking for in return.

Because your personal data is you, it has value and companies such as digi.me are working on ways that you can share it, on your own terms, for tangible benefits. Basically, it’s worth a lot more to you than a word cloud, so protect it!

Facebook-people

Back up your Facebook – or risk losing everything

Imagine you go to log into Facebook one day and your account, well, just isn’t there anymore. Scary, right?

Well that was the reality for US journalist Jeff Bercovici when a hacker took over an old email address of his that was associated with the account, and proceeded to change every single thing about it, including deleting nine years’ worth of his Facebook activity.

No red flags, no second chances, everything gone. Not worth thinking about, is it?

You can read the full story here – he is clear that a lot of the blame lies with him, in not having two-factor authentification enabled for his account, and for using an old email address that was in fact so ancient, and so unused, that it had been released back into circulation.

But, those key facts aside, just how easily the hacker was able to change everything about Jeff’s account once he was inside makes for chilling reading. Everything that made the account personal – its name, the profile picture, other pictures, posts and comments – were all either changed or deleted.

Seemingly with no comeback, without raising any security flags for unusual behaviour and with no chance to undo and get them back.

Now, because Jeff is an influential tech journalist based in San Francisco with over 7,000 Twitter followers, this is where his story starts to diverge from the usual user experience, something he acknowledges in his article.

A few phone calls and some insider assistance later, and his account has been fully restored. But, as was clear from the initial customer service response above, Facebook considers that once data has been deleted for any reason, as far as they are concerned it is gone for good.

So, how can you stop this happening to you? While this hacker wanted Jeff’s verified user status for himself, there’s nothing to stop people breaking into any account and taking it over, so what can you do to protect yourself?

Of course, taking all available security measures is a key one, so make sure you have enabled Facebook’s Login Approvals, which texts you a code if you access Facebook from an unrecognised device – ie one that hasn’t been used to log into your account before – and needs that code imputed before you can continue.

But the single most important thing you can do is back up your account. If the key details, such as your contacts, posts and pictures are saved, then anything happening to your account will not be such a disaster, right?

And how can you do that? With digi.me of course  – you can connect your personal accounts, as well as pages, to our app and run regular syncs so that the most important information you are sharing with your Facebook friends is backed up and so can’t be lost.

Check it out here – it’s free to download and use, and you get premium features including universal search, flashback and export ability free for a month as well!

Having your data – or at least a copy of the most important parts – in a place that you own and control (in this case the digi.me library on your computer) is the single most effective thing you can do to make sure that your data stays where it belongs- with you.

And why wouldn’t you want to do that?

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World’s biggest tech companies failing users on data privacy

Some of the world’s top tech companies are failing users over privacy, according to the most comprehensive research published on the subject.

Firms including Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Yahoo, AT&T, Orange France and Vodafone were surveyed by an organisation called Ranking Digital Rights using 31 measures that focused on corporate disclosure of policies and practices that affect users’ freedom of expression and privacy.

After examining their user agreements, each was given a percentage grade, with no companies scoring over 65 per cent, and only six scoring 50 per cent. Seven companies – nearly half – only scored 22 per cent.

The report’s key findings were:

  • Disclosure  about  collection,  use,  sharing,  and  retention  of  user  information  is  poor.  Even  companies  that  make efforts  to  publish  such  information  still  fail  to  communicate  clearly  with  users  about  what  is  collected  about  them, with  whom  it  is  shared,  under  what  circumstances,  and  how  long  the  information  is  kept.
  • Disclosure  about  private  and  self-regulatory  processes  is  minimal  and  ambiguous  at  best,  and  often  non-existent.  Few  companies  disclose  data  about  private  third-party  requests  to  remove  or  restrict  content or  to  share  user  information – even  when  those  requests  come  under  circumstances  such  as  a  court  order  or subpoena.
  • In  some  instances,  current  laws  and  regulations make  it  more  difficult  for  companies  to  respect  freedom  of  expression  and  privacy.

“When  we  put  the  rankings  in  perspective,  it’s  clear  there  are  no  winners,”  said  Rebecca  MacKinnon,  director  of Ranking  Digital  Rights.  “Our  hope  is  that  the  Index  will  lead  to  greater  corporate  transparency,  which  can  empower users  to  make  more  informed  decisions  about  how  they  use  technology.”

With the report’s compiler highlighting that there no “winners”, it is clear that the losers are users creating and posting pictures and videos to platforms that are unclear at best about what they can actually do with them.

There was also wide differences in transparency within companies, with Facebook (owner of both Instagram and Whatsapp) found to make better disclosures about its flagship platform and the picture-sharing app than at Whatsapp, which did not always even publish privacy agreements in the right language.

Overall,  Google  ranked  highest  among the eight Internet  companies,  while  the  UK-based  Vodafone  ranked  highest among  telecommunications  companies. The Russian Mail.ru email service ranked the worst with 13 per cent.

The survey also found very low levels of web-based companies that allowed encryption of private content and control access, with the average score across the eight just six per cent.

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Facebook data transfers under threat after Safe Harbour ruled invalid

Facebook’s right to transfer personal data from the EU to the US has been dealt a blow after the pact it was being done through was declared invalid by the European Court of Justice.

The Safe Harbour agreement (Safe Harbor stateside) was a voluntary pact set up 15 years ago to get around the fact that US data protection laws are significantly less rigorous than their EU counterparts.

Under the scheme, US companies self-certified that they were talking adequate data security precautions in order to be able to access and use European data.

More than 5,000 US companies take advantage of it, as well as global tech giants such as Facebook, which registers users outside of the US and Canada under its Ireland subsidiary Facebook Ireland Ltd. It is estimated to be reponsible for 83.1% of all worldwide Facebook users, but moves data from Dublin to the US to be processed.

But after whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed the mass surveillance activities of America’s National Security Agency, which were alleged to include European data, in 2013, Austrian privacy campaigner Max Schrems asked the Irish Data Protection Commission to do an audit of what material Facebook was passing on.

They declined, citing Safe Harbour, so he appealed to the European Court of Justice, which has today ruled in his favour.

Following the judgement, Mr Schrems said: “I very much welcome the judgement of the Court, which will hopefully be a milestone when it comes to online privacy.

“This judgement draws a clear line. It clarifies that mass surveillance violates our fundamental rights. Reasonable legal redress must be possible. The decision also highlights that governments and businesses cannot simply ignore our fundamental right to privacy, but must abide by the law and enforce it.

“This decision is a major blow for US global surveillance that heavily relies on private partners. The judgement makes it clear that US businesses cannot simply aid US espionage efforts in violation of European fundamental rights. At the same time this case law will be a milestone for constitutional challenges against similar surveillance conducted by EU member states.
“There are still a number of alternative options to transfer data from the EU to the US. The judgement makes it clear, that now national data protection authorities can review data transfers to the US in  each individual case –
while ‘safe harbor’ allowed for a blanket allowance.
“Despite some alarmist comments I don’t think that we will see major disruptions in practice.”

Facebook had yet to comment at the time of publication, but it may well be forced to stop EU-US data transfers at least in the short term, at least until new certified contracts are in place.

Two things are immediately obvious – this will have a wider impact not just for data processing operations like Facebook, but any company that transfers any data overseas for any reason.

And secondly that you can only have true control of your data when you hold it under your own resources, although of course you may need to trade it for access to services from external companies.

If data security and privacy concerns you – and it should – digi.me is committed to giving you back control of your data, for you to use as you wish. Download a free trial here.