Digi.me featured on Entrepreneur

Personal data and the lack of consumer trust and control over what is held by others is becoming one of the defining issues of our times.

And our founder and chairman Julian Ranger is now firmly established as an expert in how this can all be handled so much better than at present.

He is quoted extensively in this new Entrepreneur.com article looking at 4 Ways the Fight Over Data is Getting Way More Personal, which covers the fact Facebook effectively has a global monopoly as well as how new European regulation will change the face of personal data.

It also looks at how both technological advancements and public opinion are both challenging the status quo, with a focus on digi.me and its vision to bring back control to the user, putting them at the centre of their connected world in the Internet of Me.

It’s well worth reading in full, and is summed up by this very apt statement: “It will be exciting to see how entrepreneurs step into this space. In the same way that the Internet connected us in a way that few people could have imagined, returning data to its owners could change the Internet into a vastly different place yet again.”

Hurrah to that!


Digi.me through to finals of Pitch@Palace 6.0!

Here at digi.me, we’re delighted to be able to tell you that we’re one of the finalists in the Duke of York’s Pitch@Palace 6.0.

Our founder and executive chairman, Julian Ranger, will attend Boot Camp at the Harwell Space Campus in Oxfordshire with the other finalists this Friday.

There, a panel of judges will choose up to 15 companies to actually pitch at the grand final, on November 2 at St James’s Palace in London, although all finalists will attend.

Excitingly, in addition to the main pitching spots, there is also a People’s Choice award up for grabs – and each finalist will make a one-minute video encouraging people to vote for them.

We look forward to sharing ours with you as soon as it’s ready (likely to be October 17) – so get those voting fingers ready!


Digi.me founder joins Kantara Initiative board to further global personal data vision

Julian Ranger, the founder and executive chairman of digi.me, has been invited to join the board of global identity experts Kantara Initiative.

As the personal data economy continues to grow apace, companies industry-wide are looking to Kantara to forge the best possible community framework to encourage sustained innovation and growth for all.

With its recent £5.3m Series A raise digi.me, which will also join the organisation, and Julian are expertly placed to add to and develop the innovation already present.

Kantara has made a name for itself as a hub for inventors, thinkers and innovators thanks to its can-do attitude and proven ability to construct solutions to complex data and privacy problems. This includes the Consent Receipt specification, designed to turn on its head the traditional business and consumer relationship and put the user back in control.

Digi.me also has a proven record in finding innovative technical solutions to personal data and privacy problems, and will imminently release a consented sharing Permission Access platform, which will allow users to gather together all their health and financial details and share them, if they wish, with businesses in exchange for personalised benefits.

Julian, the creator of STASYS’ iSMART process, the de facto standard for military communications interoperability worldwide, said: “Ecosystems grow faster when systems can interoperate and businesses are more likely to be used by other businesses if their solutions do not lock users in.

“As one of the most well funded personal data start-ups strongly committed to interoperability, which Kantara has a strong track record in, we are happy to do so on behalf of the whole ecosystem and not just digi.me. After all as the ecosystem grows, so will opportunities for us.”

“We are delighted to welcome Julian and digi.me on board,” said Allan Foster, president, Kantara Initiative.  “Julian’s expertise and experience will prove invaluable to Kantara’s mission to develop innovative initiatives to drive the digital identity transformation.  Personal data is an important element of this transformation.”

Colin Wallis, executive director, Kantara Initiative, added, “Everyone in the personal data arena knows that serious innovation is needed – and quickly.  We need to continue moving forward toward standards development, specifications and taxonomies – the fuel that will drive this new community. We look forward to Julian and digi.me helping make that happen.”

Julian will join a truly global board, with members from the US, Canada and Japan, over half of which reside outside the US.



Who am I? #iamdata – a new digi.me campaign

As human beings, we are all the sum of our experiences – but online we are defined by the personal data we scatter as we go about our lives.

At digi.me, we believe that your data is yours, that it is powerful and that it is valuable.

And we want to help you take back control, by enabling you to get your personal data from all over the web, see it in ways you couldn’t before and then (soon) share it if you wish.

Download digi.me now to get started!



Omidyar Network investment completes digi.me’s Series A at £5.3M ($7M).

Digi.me, the pioneering start-up transforming how consumers and businesses unlock the value of personal data, has closed its Series A round at £5.3m ($7m) with a $1m investment from Omidyar Network, the impact investment firm created by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar.

Digi.me is developing a unique Permissioned Access platform built on its patent-pending technology that will allow users to bring together data from across their lives, including health,  financials and more, and give them the option to share it with businesses for personalised services, convenience or reward.

With digi.me, consumers get back control of how and where their personal data is used, while businesses get the wholly correct and permissioned data they lack today for innovation and service improvements – creating a transparent relationship and delivering a true win-win situation.

Digi.me founder and chairman Julian Ranger said: “Omidyar Network’s investment in digi.me is a recognition that our vision of re-defining the overall relationship that both users and businesses have with personal data is well and truly on its way.

“Whilst new regulations such as GDPR will force some changes, we are ahead of the curve and developing the platform that will enable a transparent and trustworthy relationship between consumers and businesses.

“Being part of the Omidyar Network “family” is also giving us access to amazing businesses and non-for-profit organisations for which the transparent use of personal data will enable deeper customer relationships”.

Omidyar Network Investment Partner CV Madhukar said: “We at Omidyar Network believe that individual empowerment in today’s economy requires one to have the ability to control the personal data that shapes one’s digital identity.

“Digi.me’s solution is particularly compelling in that it ensures privacy through its “don’t see, don’t touch, don’t hold” approach to user data:  Storage, access, and use of personal data rests with the owner.

“Digi.me’s team, innovative solutions, and business model position the company well to set the bar in the ‘me-to-business’ market.”

Digi.me’s current version of the app, which gathers pictures and posts from the major social media networks, is distributed in over 140 countries and in 11 languages. It proved that aggregating personal data streams to bring them to life achieves greater value and personal insight that is impossible to get when that data is scattered across the web.

With the digi.me app, users have their online life at their fingertips with tools including universal search across all platforms, daily flashbacks, the ability to create custom collections of content, data export and more. The ability to add health and financial data will come later this year, with other streams including shopping to follow shortly after.

Digi.me’s unique approach and technology also guarantees that all user data remains wholly private to the individual. Digi.me doesn’t see, touch nor hold any of the personal data downloaded by the user. The app, which is available for PC, Mac, iOS and Android, simply aggregates, normalises and encrypts the data allowing it to be searched, presented and shared in ways that were impossible until now.

With the Series A funding led by Swiss Re complete, digi.me is firmly focused on future innovation and is working on projects with world-leading businesses in the health, finance, FMCG and telco sectors. It is also on course to set up a ‘living lab’ that will be announced later this year.



digi.me team conquers The Three Peaks

Here at digi.me, we’re not just desk-bound techies – and to prove it a large contingent from the office has just conquered the infamous (in the UK at least) Three Peaks Challenge.

This involves climbing the highest mountains of England, Scotland and Wales – Scafell Pike, Ben Nevis and Snowdon – in 24 hours.  The time is almost equally split between climbing and driving – and it’s pretty tough.

But this is the team that had already done Tough Mudder – so they’re pretty tough too.

Read more about the trip, and see lots of amazing photographs (including digi.me literally on top of the world) at this link, written by team member (and our Chief Creative Office) Pascal on Medium.


Colour me dataful – check out the new version of the digi.me iOS app

Because digi.me is never standing still and always evolving, welcome to the Colour Edition of our iOS app – featuring more colour, quicker navigation and iOS 10 support.

Search has been given a makeover, so pretty, colourful, bouncy buttons await you.

While we were there we tweaked the date selector to make it a little more obvious (and colourful). It seems to have done the trick, at least from our early tests – but do let us know what you think.

A number of you wanted a way to quickly jump to a particular month whilst scrolling. We studied how others have cracked that and settled on a very cool approach Google use for their Docs app.

Our new quick scroll will show itself when you start to scroll through your posts (or you can swipe it in from the right). Grab it and you’ll see each month listed. Click on one of these to jump down to posts from that month or just use it to quickly scroll😉 Oh and it’s pretty colourful.

Gestures are a funny mixed bag of joy. Once known they speed things up, but they can be easily forgotten. So we’ve tidied up the post view itself. You now have quick access to sharing and closing. Tap the caption to read any comments and from there you can go see the original.

Swipes are still there if that’s how you roll. But you want to know if we added colour right? We felt your photos are so bright that we didn’t need to🙂

One final gem we managed to get in this release is support for Spotlight search. Ever pull down on your home screen to search your device? If you do (and you should) you’ll now see results from your digi.me library included. So next time you’re quickly searching for a friend’s number you might see photos they commented on or were tagged in.

Love our app? (and we hope you do!) Then please leave us a review to share the love with others. Got comments? Shake the app to send feedback, or leave a comment below.


Positives to take from WhatsApp sharing personal data with Facebook

WhatsApp’s decision to start sharing user data with Facebook has rightly made waves around the world, mostly for the wrong reasons, but there are still positives we can take from the situation.

Firstly, WhatsApp was upfront about what it was planning to do, (handing over personal information including users’ phone numbers to Facebook as part of plans to allow businesses to message users, which will also allow Facebook to better target ads). Now, they may well have thought they couldn’t hide it even if they wanted to, as it required a change to their privacy policy, but still – openness about what companies are doing with personal data is always to be commended, and will become a legal requirement for companies operating in the EU from 2018 when the GDPR comes in.

That said, of course, WhatsApp should never have forced this on their users, and opt-in would have been an immensely better decision. (If you want to opt out, see here for details regardless of whether you’ve accepted the new terms and conditions.)

Secondly, users and the media didn’t just take it lying down – there were multiple articles outlining why this was a mistake for WhatsApp and criticising both companies across not just tech outlets but respected mainstream media – so the days of people just shrugging when massive changes are made to privacy policies without consultation are over.

Thirdly – and arguably most importantly – those in charge of protecting and safeguarding our privacy are showing they have teeth (and plan to use them) with both the UK’s Information Commissioner and France’s CNIL saying they plan to look into the decision and would be following it ‘with great vigilance’. in addition to a complaint to the Federal Trades Commission from US privacy groups.

Fourth, and finally, there are (very early) signs that people aren’t as ready to be loyal to messaging platforms, even popular ones, with a wealth of online comment of WhatsApp users looking for other, more private, platforms, and mainstream articles such as this one in Mashable.

Obviously we all hope for less, rather than more, personal data sharing without our consent, and there’s rightly a lot of anger at this move. But a sea change is coming, where users will be the ones back in control of their data, sharing it on their terms, and the public visibility and understanding needed to help make that a reality is very much underway.

Digital Catapult and digi.me: a success story!

Whether you’re starting out, growing or scaling up with your tech app, it can be a tough world out there.

We’ve been lucky enough to work closely with Digital Catapult, digital economy specialists who help SMEs grow and scale faster and smarter.

Scroll through below to view the case study we have just done with them:


What is big data?

Personal data makes up the sum of our lives – but how often do we use the phrase ‘big data’ without fully understanding what it means?

We know – or should do – that pretty much everything we do these days leaves a digital footprint of some kind, but how many people think about or know what happens to that data once we’ve created it? Or that it’s not just what we do online, but offline as well – if it involves carrying a smartphone or using something like an Oyster travel card that knows where you’ve been and when.

Creating more data about ourselves every single day, we also produce an evermore detailed picture of who we are and what we like and do, that is easy for advertisers to track, gather and then monetise, either by tracking us online or selling that data on.

Scary, right? And more than a little annoying. The most obvious manifestation is targeted ads, that follow you around the web once you’ve searched for something.

But, as the advertisers don’t actually know you, although they’re trying very hard to act as if  they do, that information is very often inaccurate – not least if you’be bought a present for a friend or relative of the opposite gender, for example, or for a child.

So big data is omnipresent, evergrowing and often wrong – but what else is it? As a primer, this piece by BBC Radio presenter Timandra Harkness is my new go-to.

Smart on how data enriches our lives while also succinctly flagging up the issues with letting artifical intelligence overtake the human variety, she sums up thus:

“Big data has immense potential, no doubt about that. I met people who are using it to fight disease, to build a global database of destructive and dangerous insects, to prevent plane crashes, and to look into the darkest corners of the universe. But when it comes to human beings, it can be too big for its boots. And the fact we’re so willing to hand over life-changing decisions to big data says less about its true capabilities than it does about our lack of trust in ourselves, and in each other.”